Sunday, September 27, 2009

Choppers

This both a negative transfer to photopaper and the original using ID-UV film on my EE100 special.


Pulling a chain

This both a negative transfer to photopaper and the original using ID-UV film on my EE100 special. The transfer turned out a bit darker on this.




Model Shoot at the Falls

This both a negative transfer to photopaper and the original using ID-UV film on my EE100 special. A blonde figurine was the model.


The Airstream Holiday

This both a negative transfer to photopaper and the original using ID-UV film on my EE100 special. A model airstream was used for this shot.


Blonde on Beach

This both a negative transfer to photopaper and the original using ID-UV film on my EE100 special. A little blonde figurine is the model.




In Chains

This both a negative transfer to photopaper and the original using ID-UV film on my EE100 special.







Polaroid Transfers to Photo Paper

Earlier I wrote about transferring the polaroid negative to photopaper - here I'll expand upon it a bit. I have now done a few batches - the 'dry transfers' - slapping the negative onto photopaper and peeling them back later - have been largely unsuccessful. However, wet transfers have gone very well. I like this process as it can give you two prints for one :). I have tried this successfull with Studio 125i and ID-UV film, both expired.

What you need:
  • Polaroid Negative
  • Thick book
  • Kettle
  • Tray
  • Spatula
  • Timer
  • Rolling Pin
  • Tea Towel
  • optional: white vinegar
  • optional: dinner plate

Here's are some more detailed
  1. Use Gloss 10 x 15cm photo paper (I used coded
  2. Take your photo, when you peel your negative off, instantly slap it on the glossy photo paper
  3. Place the photo paper inside a hardcover book (the negative should be stuck to the photopaper)
  4. Leave the book shut for about 30mins (probably need much less time than this)
  5. When ready, peel the negative away from the photo paper.
  6. Place the Negatives attached to the Photopaper in a tray
  7. Boil some water in the Kettle
  8. Setting the timer, pour the water on the negative/photopaper
  9. Use the spatula to hold the paper in the tray (to keep from floating from the top). After 1 minute, pour out water, and pour more hotwater on the negatives
  10. Repeat the above process 3 times.
  11. After at least 3 minutes in the hotwater place a tea towel on flat surface, then the negative on the towel. Fold part of the towel over the negative.
  12. The idea is to get as much water out the negative - take your rolling pill and go over the negative sandwiched between the tea towel. Time this - do this for 1 minute.
  13. Pull apart the negative.
The posts following this one show some examples of ID UV photopaper transfers.

Sunday, September 20, 2009

Shallow Grave, The Sequel

Another shallow grave, this time the victim was buried at the beach.

The Stand In

There is a light leak in my camera, but I still like the effects. Its the imperfections of film that make it so endearing to me. Shot on UV-ID Film

Saturday, September 12, 2009

Shallow Grave

Shot a Karaka Bay, with EE100 and 125i Film. Click to enlarge.

The Landscape Photographer

Here is the 'Positive' (normal image) from the transfer below. In case you are wondering, its 1/18 scale action figure holding a 1/12 scale doll camera. I like to pretend he's shooting a large format camera :) Shot on my EE100 Special camera with Polaroid 125i Film - very expired.




Polaroid Transfers on Glossy Photo Paper (Really Easy!)

The reason I haven't tried transfers before is that I am on location and usually don't have proper supplies to do traditional transfers when I am out about on the beach, hiking, or outdoors in general. I've always felt a bit guilty about having to discard the negative.

If you are a newbie to polaroid (like me) transfers are simply 'reusing' the negative portion of the polaroid pack film by transferring it to another surface.

Now you don't have to feel guilty about wasting the negatives anymore - I just tried using a new technique that I learned from Milgy, a Polaroid user in Great Britain. And you can do this anywhere!

What you need:
  • Pack Film negative. In the examples below I used Polaroid 125i Film
  • glossy photo paper, i prefer 10x 15cm (4x6 in)
  • hardcover book
  • optional: rolling pin
  • optional: water pan

Here's what I did:
  1. Get some glossy photo paper, I used Kodak Gloss 10 x 15cm photo paper.
  2. Take your photo, when you peel your negative off, instantly slap it on the glossy photo paper
  3. Place the photo paper inside a hardcover book (the negative should be stuck to the photopaper)
  4. Leave the book shut for about 30mins (probably need much less time than this)
  5. When ready, peel the negative away from the photo paper.
  6. Optional, use a rolling pin - put the photo paper on a hard surface and go over the negative with a rolling pin. Peel the negative away.
Too my surprise, the peeling the negative away felt much like peeling the negative away from the original. Apparently you can do this with Fuji FP100c, which I've read

Here are some results - note I think the blotches come from rain, it was raining lightly when I took the photos, I think they add to the mystique! The positive copies will posted after this :



Here is another way you can do this, I did some shots where there negative was sticking well:
  1. Place photo/negative in flat pan
  2. Pour hot water in the pan
  3. Take out photo, place on flat surface
  4. Use rolling pin to flatten image
  5. Peel Negative from photo paper
  6. Allow to dry
The effect is alot different - in this case - it looks rather 'antiquey' like a worn newspaper photograph. I am not sure if all the film will look this, but it yellowed and had some purpley marks from the emulsion:

Tuesday, September 8, 2009

Mafioso story with a twist

I'll be uploading some new shots from my new-to-me EE100. Here's another one i did with some action figures. Shot on expired ID-UV film


Saturday, September 5, 2009

Reminding the Gap

I am going to do a post sometime about some of my Camera's. I've recently picked up an EE100 special for $10. Hopefully I'll have some more updates soon. Taken with ID-UV expired film at the Parnell Train Station.